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Gluten Intolerance and Mineral Deficiency

Gluten Intolerance: Do You Have It Or Are You Just Simply Mineral Deficient? You’re may be one of every 100 British who are diagnosed with either gluten intolerance or allergy. But rather than allergic to wheat, your sensitivity to gluten could be caused by lack of particular trace minerals like zinc and magnesium. A growing […]

Gluten Intolerance: Do You Have It Or Are You Just Simply Mineral Deficient?

You’re may be one of every 100 British who are diagnosed with either gluten intolerance or allergy. But rather than allergic to wheat, your sensitivity to gluten could be caused by lack of particular trace minerals like zinc and magnesium. A growing number of health practitioners are now looking at the flip side of the coin when it comes to diagnosing the symptoms of gluten intolerance. Recent studies proved that missing or lacking vital nutrients and minerals in the daily diet can result in having gluten intolerance symptoms. If you think you are suffering from this medical condition, you may want to double check if it really is the case, or you may just lack important minerals in your system.

Although it is definite that people with gluten intolerance are allergic to wheat, which prevents their bodies to absorb enough minerals on top of an already mineral-deficient diet, it may also be that mineral deficiency is the actual cause of gluten intolerance.

Gluten Intolerance and Zinc Deficiency

To define gluten intolerance, it is easier to liken it with allergic response in which a person experiences an adverse reaction after consuming particular food or product. However, to correct some misconceptions, gluten intolerance should NOT be regarded as food allergy at all. It’s a problem of weak gut. Many people with gluten issues actually suffer from a damaged digestive tract.

People with gluten intolerance and celiac disease suffer from severe mal-absorption of important nutrients, leading to mineral deficiency. Gluten is known to be harmful to people who have sensitivity to it and it can affect the ability of the small intestine to absorb vital nutrients; thus the deficiency. However, it is also possible that people with gluten intolerance are not consuming enough zinc, which could intensify or even directly cause gluten intolerance symptoms. Zinc, after all, is crucial for the regular functioning of more than 100 body enzymes, including regulating digestive processes. Some of its most common essential functions include:

  •  Protein Synthesis
  • Male Fertility
  • Foetal Development
  • Energy Metabolism
  • Vitamin A Metabolism
  • Healing Wounds
  • Transportation of Carbon Dioxide
  • Hemoglobin Production
  • Collagen Synthesis
  • Prostaglandin Function

Moreover, zinc has a powerful healing effect on the mucosal lining, a lining of the stomach that protects us from contamination during the digestion process.

Gluten Intolerance and Magnesium Deficiency

Another important mineral that may be deficient from your body causing you to suffer from gluten intolerance is magnesium. This mineral is vital in keeping bones healthy and in aiding proper absorption of nutrients. Also, it helps the body in utilising vitamin D appropriately; keeping muscles and the nervous system healthy; and maintaining a regular heart and metabolic function.

The lack of magnesium can cause a myriad of illnesses, including gluten intolerance. Dr. Craig A. Maxwell, a celebrated osteopathic physician in Ohio, believes that the varied consequences of magnesium deficiency serve as a host to ostensibly diverse illness symptoms. While Dr. Maxwell does not completely suggest that gluten intolerance is directly caused by magnesium deficiency, the connection between both conditions seems to go both ways.

Symptoms of Gluten Intolerance

The symptoms of gluten intolerance are far more complex than what it seems. Since the illness can cause complications, some manifestations of this medical condition may not directly point to gluten intolerance until complete tests are done, which normally takes time. The symptoms include:

  1.  Digestive problem like bloating, gas, diarrhoea or constipation.
  2. Chicken skin or Keratosis Pilaris that is visible on the back of the arms.
  3. Other diseases leading to iron, zinc, vitamin A deficiency and other nutrient deficits as a result of the body’s poor malabsorption.
  4. Neurologic symptoms like dizziness, fatigue and brain fog. Some patients feel tired after eating a meal that has gluten.
  5. Autoimmune diseases like Ulcerative Colitis, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, Lupus, Rheumatoid arthritis, Scleroderma or Multiple sclerosis, and Psoriasis.
  6. Migraine headaches
  7. Hormonal imbalances such as PCOS, PMS and some unexplained fertility issues.
  8. Mood issues such like depression, mood swings, and anxiety.
  9. Chronic fatigue or fibromyalgia.
  10. Joint pains, swelling, or inflammation. These can be felt in the knees, hips and fingers.

It is vital to mention that most of these symptoms are the same with zinc and magnesium deficiency. Therefore, unless a complete test for gluten intolerance and mineral deficiency is done, it is not safe to self-medicate at home.

Natural Sources of Zinc and Magnesium

In general, the recommended daily dose of zinc is 15 milligrams for adult men and women and 250 to 300 milligrams of magnesium, taken twice daily. Dr. Patrick Kingsley believes that the absorption of magnesium is partially affected by an enzyme that is dependent itself on magnesium; thus making it difficult for other people to absorb this mineral. With this, Dr. Kingsley suggests using transdermal magnesium instead.

While you can boost your zinc and magnesium levels by taking supplements, eating foods that are rich in minerals is safer and healthier.

Foods Rich in Zinc

The top 5 sources of zinc include:

  • 3 ounces of oyster (fried, cooked, breaded). It gives 74 milligrams of zinc/serving
  • 3 ounces of beef (braised or roasted) – 7.0 milligrams
  • 3 ounces Alaska king crab – 6.5 milligrams
  • 3 ounces broiled beef patty – 5.3 milligrams
  • Breakfast cereal – 3.8 milligrams

Foods Rich in Magnesium

At least 5 servings of any of the following foods can give enough quantity of magnesium needed on a daily basis:

  •  ½ cup of quinoa
  • ½ cup of boiled spinach
  • 1 cup of kidney beans
  • 1 cup of brown rice
  • 1 cup of raisin bran
  • 1 cup of shredded wheat
  • 1 cup of lentils
  • 1 cup of oatmeal
  • 2 bananas
  • 2 slices of whole wheat bread

Finally, it is important to take note of other factors that help in the absorption of these minerals. If you are zinc deficient and are trying to increase your intake of this mineral, you have to avoid taking calcium-rich foods or supplements in conjunction to consuming zinc as this lowers the absorption level of this mineral. Animal-protein-based foods help in zinc absorption. On the other hand, you need Vitamins B1, D3, E, B6 and Selenium in aiding magnesium absorption.

 

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Aude Seynt Martin

Written by Aude Seynt Martin

Aude is an ex corporate Lawyer with a passion for health, self development and independence which lead her to give up her former career to help others through health.


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